Question I have a MSI 1660 super and do i need a i5 9600k or i5 9600kf ?

Feb 17, 2020
14
3
15
The following components (i didn't buy them, but im planning to unless if you have a better solution) :
Motherboard : Gigabyte Z390 AORUS Master wifi
RAM : Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2x8GB)
SSD : Crucial P1 1TB 3D NAND NVMe PCIe M.2 SSD
GPU : Msi GeForce GTX 1660 Super

So, should i get the i5 9600k or the i5 9600kf or even another processor ? please help me asap.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: lermite

Kaamos_Llama

Community Contributor
Jan 31, 2020
105
131
270
Assuming you already have all the parts you listed, and it being such a huge jump to the 9700K then, it depends.

The IGPU is useful if you ever have GPU issues, without it you wont be able to display anything without a graphics card.

Do you have access to another GPU in case of emergency? Either a family member or friend, or an old card in the cupboard that you can use. Some people will keep a GT710 or another low budget card around for troubleshooting. If so get the 9600KF and save a bit.

If not I'd probably just get the 9600K because the extra 30 or so wouldnt be that much to spend for a little peace of mid in the long run IMO.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zoid
Feb 17, 2020
175
172
270
What's the price difference between the two for you?

Just for gaming? Do you stream at all?

To be honest, getting an AORUS Master motherboard and then only putting an i5 in it seems a bit of a waste unless you have very, very niche needs from the PC. You can still get a decent enough board for a lot less cash, depending on local pricing. e.g. the AORUS Pro is very decent and ~£75+ cheaper., and even that's probably a bit overkill.

Of the two CPUs, I'd be tempted like @Kaamos_Llama is by the integrated graphics on the 9600k for troubleshooting / interim graphics in case the GPU ever has a problem. But I'm not sure either CPU is your best choice.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zoid
Jan 13, 2020
230
333
670
It would definitely be helpful to know what budget you are working with, and like @Kaamos_Llama mentioned it would be helpful to know whether you already own those parts or whether you're planning to get them.

Without any further information, I would tend to agree with the other two posters that having an IGPU is useful.
 
Feb 17, 2020
14
3
15
It would definitely be helpful to know what budget you are working with, and like @Kaamos_Llama mentioned it would be helpful to know whether you already own those parts or whether you're planning to get them.

Without any further information, I would tend to agree with the other two posters that having an IGPU is useful.
I am working with a 1000$USD (1300$CAD) pc and no, i didn't buy any of the components. Thank you
 
Feb 17, 2020
14
3
15
Assuming you already have all the parts you listed, and it being such a huge jump to the 9700K then, it depends.

The IGPU is useful if you ever have GPU issues, without it you wont be able to display anything without a graphics card.

Do you have access to another GPU in case of emergency? Either a family member or friend, or an old card in the cupboard that you can use. Some people will keep a GT710 or another low budget card around for troubleshooting. If so get the 9600KF and save a bit.

If not I'd probably just get the 9600K because the extra 30 or so wouldnt be that much to spend for a little peace of mid in the long run IMO.
Thank you very much
 
Feb 17, 2020
14
3
15
What's the price difference between the two for you?

Just for gaming? Do you stream at all?

To be honest, getting an AORUS Master motherboard and then only putting an i5 in it seems a bit of a waste unless you have very, very niche needs from the PC. You can still get a decent enough board for a lot less cash, depending on local pricing. e.g. the AORUS Pro is very decent and ~£75+ cheaper., and even that's probably a bit overkill.

Of the two CPUs, I'd be tempted like @Kaamos_Llama is by the integrated graphics on the 9600k for troubleshooting / interim graphics in case the GPU ever has a problem. But I'm not sure either CPU is your best choice.
No, i do not plan to stream, and thank you very much for your help.
 
Jan 13, 2020
230
333
670
I am working with a 1000$USD (1300$CAD) pc and no, i didn't buy any of the components. Thank you
If you have not purchased any of the components yet, I would advocate giving them some more thought. I do not recommend any i5 CPUs for $1,300 CAD gaming builds at this time. I would currently recommend you go Ryzen unless you are wanting to spend for a higher-end i7. Right now it looks like you can get a Ryzen 5 3600X or a Ryzen 7 2700X for about the same price, and both are cheaper than the i5-9600K.

If you gave me that budget and asked me to come up with a rig I would recommend something along these lines:

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor ($234.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B450 I AORUS PRO WIFI Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard ($161.99 @ PC-Canada)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($106.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($144.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($509.99 @ Mike's Computer Shop)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Total: $1288.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-18 16:14 EST-0500


Now I don't know what your budget includes. What all are you wanting to buy with your $1,300 CAD budget? Do you need peripherals or just internals? Do you have a case you are reusing? What requirements do you have for this PC?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oussebon
Feb 17, 2020
14
3
15
If you have not purchased any of the components yet, I would advocate giving them some more thought. I do not recommend any i5 CPUs for $1,300 CAD gaming builds at this time. I would currently recommend you go Ryzen unless you are wanting to spend for a higher-end i7. Right now it looks like you can get a Ryzen 5 3600X or a Ryzen 7 2700X for about the same price, and both are cheaper than the i5-9600K.

If you gave me that budget and asked me to come up with a rig I would recommend something along these lines:

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor ($234.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B450 I AORUS PRO WIFI Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard ($161.99 @ PC-Canada)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($106.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($144.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($509.99 @ Mike's Computer Shop)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Total: $1288.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-18 16:14 EST-0500


Now I don't know what your budget includes. What all are you wanting to buy with your $1,300 CAD budget? Do you need peripherals or just internals? Do you have a case you are reusing? What requirements do you have for this PC?
My budget is flexible and going up to 1600$CAD if needed to buy the pc, a 4k eyecare monitor, a mouse, a keyboard and speakers. Thank you very much
 
Jan 13, 2020
230
333
670
My budget is flexible and going up to 1600$CAD if needed to buy the pc, a 4k eyecare monitor, a mouse, a keyboard and speakers. Thank you very much
In that case I would recommend strongly considering a Ryzen-based system. I'm not an expert on monitors but it sounds like after buying the peripherals you're going to be in the neighborhood of $1k leftover for PC components. At this price point you are going to get a lot more bang for your buck with AMD, and a better upgrade path moving forward. Something like the parts list I posted above is a good starting point, but I would be happy to fine tune recommendations if you have additional questions.
 
Feb 17, 2020
14
3
15
In that case I would recommend strongly considering a Ryzen-based system. I'm not an expert on monitors but it sounds like after buying the peripherals you're going to be in the neighborhood of $1k leftover for PC components. At this price point you are going to get a lot more bang for your buck with AMD, and a better upgrade path moving forward. Something like the parts list I posted above is a good starting point, but I would be happy to fine tune recommendations if you have additional questions.
Thank you, but do you have a pc with a i5 9600k processor ? please.
 
Jan 13, 2020
230
333
670
Thank you, but do you have a pc with a i5 9600k processor ? please.
I have a Ryzen 7 3800X. The decision to purchase one was one I made after doing extensive research. Prior to purchasing my R7 3800X, I had an Intel i5-4690K which served me very well for years. I say this to illustrate that I am making my recommendations based off of my knowledge of the current CPU market and not based off of any brand loyalties.

The fact of the matter is that for the majority of use cases, Intel i3s and i5s are simply inferior to their similarly priced (or cheaper) Ryzen counterparts. At the top end of the enthusiast market, Intel still makes very good i7s and i9s that are competitive, but in general Ryzens are more modern, better processors in 2020, and the AM4 platform is better suited for future upgrades. That's why you'll hear them recommended a lot in this forum.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oussebon
Feb 17, 2020
14
3
15
I have a Ryzen 7 3800X. The decision to purchase one was one I made after doing extensive research. Prior to purchasing my R7 3800X, I had an Intel i5-4690K which served me very well for years. I say this to illustrate that I am making my recommendations based off of my knowledge of the current CPU market and not based off of any brand loyalties.

The fact of the matter is that for the majority of use cases, Intel i3s and i5s are simply inferior to their similarly priced (or cheaper) Ryzen counterparts. At the top end of the enthusiast market, Intel still makes very good i7s and i9s that are competitive, but in general Ryzens are more modern, better processors in 2020, and the AM4 platform is better suited for future upgrades. That's why you'll hear them recommended a lot in this forum.
Ok thank you very much
 
Feb 17, 2020
175
172
270
Taking the liberty of trimming @Zoid 's build with a less expensive (but still decent enough) B450 mobo, etc, to try to squidge in a case and a decent monitor within 1600 CAD budget.

Strongly agreed with the Ryzen 5 3600 recommendation too btw.

No Windows licence included - either further trimmings can be made (RX 5700 non-XT GPU?), or the OP can transfer one from an existing system perhaps.

4k eyecare monitor
Why 4k? If it's for gaming? Unless you only run certain kinds of less demanding games at carefully managed settings, you're not going to get a particularly good 4k gaming experience at this budget level. I'm not sure there's much point buying a PC that is expensive, but still can't really handle modern 4k gaming, to run games poorly on a budget monitor.

A 1440p high refresh monitor would be a much, much better fit. And would also be more economical re: future GPU upgrades.


CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($238.00 @ Vuugo)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty B450 GAMING K4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($92.92 @ Vuugo)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($106.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial BX500 960 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ PC-Canada)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($509.99 @ Mike's Computer Shop)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($72.99 @ Vuugo)
Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($104.99 @ Canada Computers)
Monitor: AOC CQ27G1 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor ($332.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Total: $1588.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-18 19:12 EST-0500


As for the keyboard and mouse, whatever looks nice and budget-level on Amazon. You can always buy shiny peripherals as an upgrade down the line. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zoid
Feb 17, 2020
14
3
15
Taking the liberty of trimming @Zoid 's build with a less expensive (but still decent enough) B450 mobo, etc, to try to squidge in a case and a decent monitor within 1600 CAD budget.

Strongly agreed with the Ryzen 5 3600 recommendation too btw.

No Windows licence included - either further trimmings can be made (RX 5700 non-XT GPU?), or the OP can transfer one from an existing system perhaps.


Why 4k? If it's for gaming? Unless you only run certain kinds of less demanding games at carefully managed settings, you're not going to get a particularly good 4k gaming experience at this budget level. I'm not sure there's much point buying a PC that is expensive, but still can't really handle modern 4k gaming, to run games poorly on a budget monitor.

A 1440p high refresh monitor would be a much, much better fit. And would also be more economical re: future GPU upgrades.


CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($238.00 @ Vuugo)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty B450 GAMING K4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($92.92 @ Vuugo)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($106.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial BX500 960 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ PC-Canada)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($509.99 @ Mike's Computer Shop)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($72.99 @ Vuugo)
Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($104.99 @ Canada Computers)
Monitor: AOC CQ27G1 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor ($332.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Total: $1588.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-18 19:12 EST-0500


As for the keyboard and mouse, whatever looks nice and budget-level on Amazon. You can always buy shiny peripherals as an upgrade down the line.
Thank you for you help, really appreciated
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oussebon

ASK THE COMMUNITY