SteamOS as a Windows replacement...

ZedClampet

Community Contributor
SteamOS is meant specifically for the Steam Deck (previously the Steam Machine) and would take a little work, I think, to configure it for a laptop, but based on the Steam Deck Review on PC Gamer, it sounds like it would be perfect for my gaming/Internet laptop, which has had nothing but problems with Windows (I'm going to post about this in Troubleshooting when I'm done with this post).

If Valve put a little extra work into SteamOS's desktop and made it almost as user-friendly as Windows, I'd switch in an instant.

Anyone heard anything recent about SteamOS or anyone getting a Deck who can report in on the OS? I could just go with Ubuntu and Wine or Proton, but the primary purpose of this particular PC is just gaming, which seems like the perfect match for SteamOS.
 
Anyone heard anything recent about SteamOS or anyone getting a Deck who can report in on the OS? I could just go with Ubuntu and Wine or Proton, but the primary purpose of this particular PC is just gaming, which seems like the perfect match for SteamOS.
The latest reviews (I admittedly skimmed through vs read), said Steam Deck is suffering a lot from software problems. So you may want to hold off on committing to it or Steam OS. At the very least, set it up in dual boot with Windows if you can, so you can at least fall back on MS' bloatware if need be.
 
If Valve put a little extra work into SteamOS's desktop and made it almost as user-friendly as Windows, I'd switch in an instant.
I believe that I would as well, but unfortunately, I think wide support and compatibility for thousand of games will always be an issue. Not just new and recent games, but all those games going back to 20 years or more. Right now with Windows 10 I can play any game from my game libraries from any year with rarely an issue (some might take a bit of tweaking to run properly, but I've not run into any major issues).

A Steam OS for the desktop PC would have to provide the same wide ranging game support for me to switch. I'd love to see it happen, I just don't know if it's realistic. I seem to remember some news from years ago about Valve working on a Steam OS, but it just kind of fizzled out, in the news anyway.
 
Jan 23, 2020
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Productivity software's gonna be the major thing that Linux will fail at when matching Windows.

Sure, there may be some Linux apps that have support for files used by Office 2007 onward, though you won't be designing kitchens or mapping out architectural blueprints on a piece of software very few businesses even care to use.
 
If you're willing to go to the trouble to install it, it wouldn't hurt anything to try it out. If you don't like it, you can always just install Ubuntu and use Wine/Proton. I'm not sure how much Linux experience you have, but just keep in mind that some things are going to take some tweaking and workarounds to get working. It's not going to be plug-n-play, like playing games made for Windows in Windows. But if you don't mind doing that kind of thing, it might be worth trying out.

Let us know what you end up doing, and how it works out for you.
 
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