Question What are your thoughts on a controversial topic like cloud gaming

Alm

Jan 17, 2020
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We get a lot of bots in this forum so a lot of the responses are nonsensical.

Apart from Hearthstone I don't mobile game.

Cloud gaming is only bad because of the bandwidth it requires and the latency. I have a feeling it would really take off and I would use it if these two factors could be negated.
 
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Jul 29, 2021
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What kind of heat? I don't cloud game, so I haven't noticed.
Like, some people hate it and other people think it's the future.
Like this guy reviews some cloud gaming services but calls anyone who plays cloud games a ******* loser for reasons unmentioned.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-ZLFSeSz8E

And here's Linus giving an unbiased review
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3dNoCRzbAs

I personally support cloud gaming for one reason, because it's cheaper, and it eliminates the hassle of buying a new pc every 5-8 years and/or a console every 7 years. Like geforce now is 10 bucks a month, that's 120 a year and 600 every 5 years, compared to if you just buy a mid range 600 dollar pc, you get to run cyberpunk on highest settings with ray tracing on. With a 5500xt(600 pc gpu), in cyberpunk anything you go above low degrades the experience. With some cloud gaming platforms you don't even need to buy games like xcloud and PS now. And if you're a netflix user, you're gonna get games included with your subscription for free.
 
cloud games have nothing to do with pc games
right, so why does Geforce Now exist then?


Latency is main reason I won't bother, I live in Australia, servers in US... Okay, my internet is way better than it used to be but my location hasn't really become any closer. I can remember playing wow one night and having such bad lag that I only hit the thing I was fighting maybe 2 times. I died to things I had on farm. Another time it lagged me right across a region.

I still have to wait for some things even now because of locations.

I prefer to have the games locally than to rely on a server.

Like, some people hate it and other people think it's the future.
That happens with everything though, very few ideas are liked by everyone. Also, people just want to be right and have everyone agree with them, so that they don't have to doubt their actions. Always 2 sides to an argument.
 
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some people hate it and other people think it's the future
There are always people who hate any topic or product or person. It's a mugs' game to pay any attention to them, many probably amplify their stance to get more views, clicks etc. Just ignore them, there are many better things for us to spend time on.

Cloud is absolutely certain to be the future, the questions are when and how long to reach the less developed countries. The current setup of everyone having their own device is akin to everyone having their own electricity generator or water well—ie hugely wasteful of the planet's resources and hugely expensive for the consumer.

But it'll take well into the 30s before cloud achieves the reliability and economy of scale of other utilities we take for granted in the developed world.

The less developed world… well many parts still don't have reliable water or electricity, so first things first. Ubiquitous cloud hopefully in the second half of the century.
 
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Jul 29, 2021
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right, so why does Geforce Now exist then?


Latency is main reason I won't bother, I live in Australia, servers in US... Okay, my internet is way better than it used to be but my location hasn't really become any closer. I can remember playing wow one night and having such bad lag that I only hit the thing I was fighting maybe 2 times. I died to things I had on farm. Another time it lagged me right across a region.

I still have to wait for some things even now because of locations.

I prefer to have the games locally than to rely on a server.


That happens with everything though, very few ideas are liked by everyone. Also, people just want to be right and have everyone agree with them, so that they don't have to doubt their actions. Always 2 sides to an argument.
wait, didn't pentanet bring geforce now in Australia?
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtL1tSOYsM8
 
Jul 29, 2021
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maybe, I don't really know a lot about it. I only looked tonight.
I personally don't like the geforce library, heck I don't even like the steam library. I'll gladly embrace the title ''casual'', as I don't seem interested in most games, with exception to assassin's creed, I passionately play and enjoy that series and enjoy to spend loads of time in it.
 

Lutfij

Moderator
Pretty much anything and everything has their own place in the world. A screwdriver can be used to fasten and unfasten screws, while they are usually found in a workspace. They could also be used as a media to wedge between two objects to prevent them from moving around and is often a (very temporary)placeholder for a proper wedge. I've also seen some folks use a thin long screw driver to stir their glass of tang when the powder didn't dissolve well. They were thirsty and they needed their fluids pronto.

The morality of the anecdote(s) I've given is that everything has their place and given the context, they might be sensible rather than seeming absurd but you need to understand context.

Now, about cloud based gaming services, it might be a good idea, it might be a bad idea, that all depends on what background you're from and what sort of resources you have at your disposal. Resources don't mean just money or time, it can mean more than those two hence why I'm using resources.

For someone who has a capable desktop/laptop, they don't need to look into cloud based gaming services. Their system is either fine or more than fine to drive the titles they want to play off of. For someone who works very long hours or has limited funds for a capable desktop or laptop or doesn't have the space to place a system or even have the time to care for a system(single bread earner in a household with toddlers en route) when it conks out, then cloud based services are a godsend to them, since all of the maintenance is done for by said service provider. Ofc, you will need to also account for their ISP's/bandwidth since latencies are what has nerfed some of the service's outreach in regions like Asia. In fact you might want to factor in how many folks play online as opposed to offline titles since I've come across a lot of folks who still don't use legitimate copies of games and some don't even have access to internet. You're also not accounting for the need of a PC or a computing device of some sorts to do some form of work at home, so people tend to snowball their needs into one investment, hence why people think of building a $600 system that allows them to work, game, relax with and in the process grants them the option to upgrade if and when needed.

That being said, some ideas take off while some don't and get buried under progress/advancements in technology/revised thinking. Remember how people thought we'd be owning cars that would fly...? Jetsons would be around the corner...? Bladerunner was set in 2019, mind you and we're not close to what was depicted in that movie.
 
Jul 29, 2021
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Cloud gaming eliminates the renewal of your computer, Instead of spending 800 or a grand on a new gaming rig, you can save it, pay off mortgages, pay bills for a couple of months or book a hotel for 5-7 days. I see value for money in cloud gaming, and if you don't game, and you use PS, Ae or PP for high end work, you don't need a mac or a high end pc, you can do your work almost flawlessly on shadow cloud computers. ''Almost'' I say.
 
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need of a PC or a computing device of some sorts to do some form of work at home
That's covered in the Cloud Computing future for the same reason:
current setup of everyone having their own device is akin to everyone having their own electricity generator or water well—ie hugely wasteful of the planet's resources and hugely expensive for the consumer

cars that would fly … Jetsons would be around the corner
Well they both exist, just not mass market yet—probably not consumer affordable until automation benefits have bedded in.

The logic behind cloud is irresistible, it doesn't matter whether we like it or not—just prepare for it.
 
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Zloth

Community Contributor
I'm about ready to save my bullet list of pro's and con's off somewhere. This topic seems to come up every year or two. ;)

Pro: you can get VERY nice looking games with VERY cheap hardware.

Con: no mods. Well, maybe some can get officially sanctioned and put on servers, but that's never going to happen with mods that encroach on another company's IP. Nothing too controversial, either. You can forget about having a glamorous, nude woman co-piloting your Millennium Falcon in Star Citizen.

Pro: should save a lot of wear and tear on developers. They can flat out say "use these drivers with these video cards and this much CPU" instead of having to deal with issues from driver bugs, weird configurations ("sorry, we didn't test with 12 year old rudder pedals"), and all that other stuff.

Con: no hardware envelope pushing, either. Something like 3D Vision or getting non-VR games to work in VR ain't gonna happen.

Pro: stops piracy dead. You'll still get account theft, sure. Maybe you'll get a few cases where somebody in the cloud company leaks the server source code to hackers who then set up their own server,. But just downloading a game for free? There's nothing TO download! That should boost developer income a ton, which hopefully gets re-invested back into games and lowers prices for everyone.

Con: requires a lot of bandwidth. That's getting to be less of an issue in more and more parts of the world, but there's still plenty of customers that can't afford or flat out can't access the bandwidth needed to send enough frames over the wire.

Con: latency. Even with all the bandwidth you can desire, a signal from your keyboard can get to your PC and the results can be shown on your screen far faster locally than sending it out to a data center, even if it's just down the street. (People playing online shooters somehow survive it, though. More or less.)

Pro: games load instantly. Even with a killer 2Gb connection and a strangely speedy Steam, it's going to take several minutes to get a big game installed. With Cloud, you just pick it and you're playing.

Pro: not only is the hardware cheap, it's also simple. You don't need to know about drivers, or NVMe, or what your CPU's single thread performance is. PC power with console simplicity is going to be a huge sell for many.

TLDR: It changes many things. We'll gain a lot and we'll lose a lot.
 

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