New to PC Gaming

Feb 24, 2021
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Hello,

I just ordered a gaming PC to get a RTX 30 series graphics card. I was wanting to build the PC but it is impossible to get a graphics card in a timely manner. I purchased from CLX Gaming and expected to recieve the PC middle of March. I have gamed on PC's before but that was 10+ years ago. I am looking for some guideance on how to set up the PC once I receive it in regards to software to download, and how to make it run efficiently. I mostly play first person shooters. Im getting a Intel i7 10th gen, with the RTX 3060ti GPU. Any and all help would be appreciated.
 
I just engaged in CLX's live chat on their site, and though I've read they get good reviews for build quality and customer service, I can't say I'd ever recommend them. They seem to use gimmicks to pull in customers too. Theres a little "TrustPulse" popup that comes up every minute or so in the bottom left of their site, claiming so and so just bought a gaming PC. I have to wonder if they even get permission from their customers to show their names, and as far as review sites go, I've heard of TrustPilot, but never TrustPulse.

Their chat person told me when I asked what software needs installing that they don't install GeForce Experience, which they consider "bloatware". They leave things like certain browsers or even XMP being turned on to customer requests. She argued when I said W10 with it's many telemetry apps has far more bloatware than Nvidia's driver package, that W10 itself has no bloatware, and only MS Edge is bloatware. I couldn't even get her to respond to my saying leaving XMP being turned on to requests excludes the many whom don't know it NEEDS be turned on just to get the RAM to run at it's full rated speed, or that W10 is far more bloated than Nvidia's driver package, because I got a notice the chat had ended due to "long user response." I doubt it was an automated shut off either, even though it was about exactly a half hour, because obviously that could really piss off people looking to buy. And note that the majority of that half hour was me waiting at length for each response, so I imagine tons of chats, especially people asking about builds they want to buy, take longer than half hr with them responding so slowly. I took it as her "hanging up" on me because she didn't like hearing the truth of what I was saying.

To me this just seems like the dime a dozen high volume build site, that cares far more about profits than customers. To end, she said they do install all drivers and burn test the RAM, CPU, and GPU, but she didn't say with what tools or what length of time. BTW, I highly recommend going to the W10 Privacy tab in Settings and making sure all features you don't absolutely want or need are turned off. I turn off ALL telemetry in W10, and it can free up about a gig of RAM, and keep you from being snooped on. No bloat in W10, PLEEEASE! It wasn't until W10 that programs that turn off all telemetry apps became hugely popular. And note that when there are big updates for W10, you often have to go back in and turn certain telemetry apps off again, so maybe we should coin it Forceware, instead of just bloatware.

These kind of build houses often look more for naive than informed customers, with an our way or the highway attitude. I know full well though why many are going to build houses vs building their own, because the build houses are getting the GPUs, and the stores and etailers are not. My contention though is that it's far better to wait about 6 to 9 months to see if things improve. After all, a gaming PC is something that should last years, and although yeah, they can be tons of fun, they are still more a luxury than necessity, so can wait. I had to wait about 6-9 months to build my current PC due to the last bitcoin mining boon that was going on, and I'm totally glad I did.

Sorry for going on with that, it's just that I don't like people settling for such options, especially an MDO in the firefighting field, and particularly during COVID. To add, many use MSI Afterburner for setting fan profiles or monitoring temps, CPU/GPU/RAM usage, FPS, etc. Sometimes with reference vs aftercooled GPUs, particularly in small cases, you can make them run cooler (but a bit louder), with more aggressive fan profiles. They will still be quiet at idle though. I myself use ShadowPlay a lot, as it's the capture tool that has little to no performance hit. There are also a lot of drive monitoring tools. They're made by companies that manufacture drives, but you don't have to use the one made for your brand. It's not too hard to set RAM to XMP in the BIOS, but if you need any help with that, let me know the model of your MB.
 
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Feb 24, 2021
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I understand. But I couldn’t wait. If I waited I would not have the money that I did to purchase a pre built. Yes if turning the XMP on will be better I would like to know how. The motherboard I chose is:
  • ASROCK H470M PRO4 - Micro AT
 
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During bootup, hit F2. There's usually a page that shows this, but if not, just hit F2 before the W10 welcome screen. This should take you to the default EZ page of the BIOS. Click Advanced in the upper right, or hit F6 to go to the Advanced settings page. On the OC Tweaker page, go into DRAM Configuration. On this page there should be a DRAM Timings Configuration header, under which there's an option to enable XMP called Load XMP Setting.

Now just hit the Exit tab, or click Esc, both of which take you to the Exit Screen. The top option Save Changes and Exit applies the settings, then you're done. I recommend you also go back into the BIOS to look at the actual RAM speed to make sure it has changed to it's advertised, rated speed. I also recommend doing a full Mentest check on the RAM to be sure it's running error free after setting it to XMP, which is generally a given, but good to know none the less.

It's probably best you read up on the MB manual, as it shows key info on things like updating the BIOS and clearing CMOS. I don't always recommend, nor is it totally necessary to update the BIOS unless you absolutely need to for hardware compatibility (like brand new models of CPUs) or security exploit patches (depending on whether they affect your particular CPU or the way you use your PC), but it's at least good to read the description of what each BIOS update does, which most modern MBs provide.

The Main tab of the BIOS at the very top where it says UEFI Version (BIOS version) will show what BIOS version you are currently on. Consult the support page of the MB on AsRock's site to see the description of what each BIOS version does.

From what I can see, none of the BIOS updates they show on that page are necessary.

And here's that page https://www.asrock.com/MB/Intel/H470M Pro4/index.asp#BIOS

AsRock H470M Pro4 user manual

The free version of Memtest is fine, you don't need the pro. The full test btw goes through at least a dozen tests, and can take 2 hrs.
 
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I am looking for some guideance on how to set up the PC once I receive it in regards to software to download, and how to make it run efficiently
If @Frag Maniac is right about CLX, then it may be best to do a clean install of Windows to get rid of whatever crapware they bundle in. If you do, grab drivers from manufacturers' sites first & have them on a flash drive.
You might find Should I Remove It? useful, or The PC Decrapifier if they make it available again.

How to Clean Up Windows 10 With the Fresh Start Tool.
Turn off any unnecessary stuff in Task Manager's Startup tab.
Run ShutUp10

Check the Security settings before you go online, make sure Windows Defender is providing full protection. Install & update any 3rd-party security you want to use.
Check for Windows Updates multiple times until it says none available, rebooting after each update, even if it doesn't ask for a reboot.

Use Ninite for your first software installations.

If you have multiple gaming accounts, I find GOG's Galaxy 2 very good to provide one interface to most of them. Another is Playnite.
 
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You can turn your old desktop PC into a gaming monster (And it costs less than you think) ... And, contrary to what many people think, it's incredibly easy to do if your PC is compatible. As Nvidia's Ben Berraondo explains: “All you need to do is simply slide off the PC side-cover and find your PCI-E slot.

You can play at higher detail settings and resolutions, and at higher frame rates, for a smoother gaming experience. If your idea of casual gaming is playing the latest and greatest games when you find the time, then a gaming PC could make a real difference to your limited play time.
Yeah, well not surprising Nvidia makes GPU upgrades sound as easy as buying one of them, finding your Pc-Ex slot, and plugging it in. It would be FAR more responsible of them to say it's best to roughly match the capability of your CPU, to avoid bottlenecking, and check the power draw of the new graphics card to make sure your PSU, or the one you replace it with, can run it without problems, but they just want your money.
 
Feb 24, 2021
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Ok, update. The rebuild I got was having temps in the high 90s while gaming. I took off the front cover and reduced temps but was still having performance issues. I contacted the company and decided to refund the build since I have only had it since this past Sunday.
now I am going to build my pc myself with help from a friend of course.
I am looking at getting the lian li o-11 dynamic case and I am wanting to know if we could put a 120mm aio on the back of the case for the cpu cooler. Then have 3 fans on bottom for intake, and 3 fans on top for exhaust.
I am going with an i710700k, Vega ftw3 rtx3080, aorus mobo.
will putting the aio on the back work?
 
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The problem with single fan AIO coolers, is to ensure they get access to cool air, you need to mount them as intakes, but then they blow warm air from the rad into the case. There's also limited places to install them this way if the back of the case doesn't facilitate it. In that scenario you almost have to have a side mount for a 120, because even if it DOES somehow fit in the front, the hoses may not reach the CPU.

I like using a fairly large case. Mine for example has enough room for multiple HDDs, yet I can still leave the HDD bays behind the middle of the 3 120 front fans open for cool air to come straight through to my aftermarket air cooler. There are MANY decent aftermarket air coolers that will easily match if not exceed the cooling of a single 120 fan AIO, some even just 120 size and one fan, like mine.

For these reasons, the case is one of the most crucial things to decide on.
 
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