Need help with a upgrade issue

Jan 21, 2023
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Purchased a used Ryzen 9 5900x off of ebay to upgrade my sons computer, but when we installed it his computer will not boot up. We put the old processor (Ryzen 7 1700x) back in and tried to update the bios but that still didnt work. Any thoughts on what else we can try?
Dell Inspiron 5675
Dell 0477DV Motherboard
Bios is Dell Inc 1.4.1 10/14/2020
 

Zoid

Community Contributor
Jan 13, 2020
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From what I can tell after a little googling it doesn't look like your computer supports anything beyond Ryzen 1st gen. Even though newer versions of the BIOS are available, I do not believe they include support for later CPUs. This is consistent with how Dell usually operates. They don't have any business incentive to update old motherboards to support modern CPUs, when they could just sell you a whole new computer instead.
 
Jan 21, 2023
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Just ordered a new case, motherboard, power supply, memory and cpu cooler. I guess were going to attempt to build a pc now. Nothing over the top by any means. Upgraded GPU will have to wait for now.
Fractal Design Full Tower
Ryzen 9 5900x
Asus ROG Strix B550-F Motherboard
Corsair Vengeance RGB 64gb DDR4 3200 memory
CoolerMaster MLW-D24M-A18PC-R2
Corsair RM850x
3tb Hard drive
Radeon RX 580 (Need recommendations on an affordable upgrade to this)
 
Hi :)

Brians right, you're really going to want an NVME drive for the operating system. 1 or 2 TB preferably because games also run and load way faster from NVME as well as Windows. This is with a 3 year old NVME they are a bit faster now.

In addition to what Brian asked you dont need 64GB of RAM, save that money towards a GPU and get a faster 32GB kit. 3600 C16 is about where to shoot for AMD, the internal bus of the chip is linked to the speed of the RAM, and they are all capable of that speed. Just make sure you get a kit that is on the Asus RAM QVL list youll find on the motherboard support page to be as sure as possible it will work without issues.

The PSU and motherboard are very good choices, and you should be fine with any Fractal Design case.
 
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Jan 21, 2023
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We do not have a NVMe/SSD. That is something I will have to look into I guess. It replaces the (old school?) hardrive? What he has now is a Seagate Baracuda which I guess if you dont know any better works fine?
I bought the Ram based on AMD Ryzen 9 5900x info page where it says it supports up to 3200mhz?
 
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We do not have a NVMe/SSD. That is something I will have to look into I guess. It replaces the (old school?) hardrive? What he has now is a Seagate Baracuda which I guess if you dont know any better works fine?
I bought the Ram based on AMD Ryzen 9 5900x info page where it says it supports up to 3200mhz?
SSD's have been standard for 10 years as boot drives at this point, the difference in general responsiveness on the desktop is night and day. Loading and boot times are a large bonus to that. Most people use them for games and the operating system, and keep a larger hard drive or two for storing movies, pictures and the like that don't really see any benefit from the speed.

For RAM 3200 is the speed AMD officially supports, XMP profiles which you enable in the BIOS are technically overclocking. Just about everyone is using faster without issue, 3600 is the level that every Ryzen 5000 can do, many can do faster but sometimes it takes a bit of tuning. Check out the Asus page for the memory support list, you'll see kits up to 4400 listed as supported. Its a little more performance for basically the same money.

Otherwise you picked out a great PSU and a motherboard I recommend for that chip, nice job :)
 
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Jan 21, 2023
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So if i get him one of these SSDs I can just clone his current hard drive over to it? As far as the RAM goes, he will have to deal with it for now as he has other priorities, like getting a vehicle. We can still overclock the CPU and run it with the 3200mhz? Will there be any benefit in doing that or do we have to have the faster ram for that to benefit from it?
 
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I'm pretty sure you're going to want to do a fresh windows install on a new system, as that's what you'll have when you changed all the hardware. Any data that needs saving would need to be moved to an external, or you could access it from the old HDD through Windows and just delete the old Windows install. I dont pay much attention to operating systems, so @Brian Boru would probably be able to advise you better on that.

I wouldn't bother overclocking the CPU beyond using PBO in Ryzen Master if you were curious. Proper CPU overclocking is for all intents and purposes dead for performance gains.

The RAM speed is matched to the way the CPU communicates internally (Infinity Fabric), in simple terms the faster the RAM, faster the CPU works. It's not all that much difference between 3200 and 3600, but I recommend it because it doesn't really cost anymore for a little gain. 64GB is massive overkill though, extra $100 could go towards a higher tier GPU where you would see huge gains.
 
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if i get him one of these SSDs I can just clone his current hard drive over to it?
Just because you can doesn't mean you should ;)
As Kaamos said, I strongly recommend a fresh install of Windows. The longer he's used the current system, the more software he's installed and uninstalled, the more 'careless' he's been with where he gets stuff, etc etc—just dump the dreck and start fresh.

What he has now is a Seagate Baracuda
That will do fine for storing data, again as Kaamos said—can also store games from Steam in a pinch.

You haven't said what kind of games he likes, or where he buys them. If he buys a lot of big AAA games from Steam, then a 1-2TB NVMe is best so he can keep a few installed at a time—altho that's not a biggie if you have good internet download speeds, which enables frequent install and uninstall as needed.

You can move Steam installs from one drive to another, without any uninstall-install loop. So you could keep a bunch installed on a big cheap HDD, and move the current one(s) to the NVMe, and off again later.
 
Jan 21, 2023
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Just because you can doesn't mean you should ;)
As Kaamos said, I strongly recommend a fresh install of Windows. The longer he's used the current system, the more software he's installed and uninstalled, the more 'careless' he's been with where he gets stuff, etc etc—just dump the dreck and start fresh.
I hear what your saying. We just did a fresh install on his current hard drive not too long ago because his other one was failing. But I will work on getting him a SDD and well do a clean install when I get it.


That will do fine for storing data, again as Kaamos said—can also store games from Steam in a pinch.

You haven't said what kind of games he likes, or where he buys them. If he buys a lot of big AAA games from Steam, then a 1-2TB NVMe is best so he can keep a few installed at a time—altho that's not a biggie if you have good internet download speeds, which enables frequent install and uninstall as needed.
He buys all of his games from steam, I am really not sure what games he plays, I know he mentioned God of War, but he plays alot of VR games as well. Internet speeds are pretty consistent at around 345mbps download.

You can move Steam installs from one drive to another, without any uninstall-install loop. So you could keep a bunch installed on a big cheap HDD, and move the current one(s) to the NVMe, and off again later.
Not sure what you mean by "uninstall-install loop".
 
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I will have to make sure he knows how to manage that
Naturally, we've got you covered there too ;)

 

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