Question Rate my Ultra Wide Gaming Budget Build [PCPARTPICKER List In Thread]

May 2, 2020
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These are my thoughts, I saw the price at the bottom of the list and thought how this could be a budget build until I saw your monitor haha.

- I would say go for a B450 board since X570 is only needed if you need those PCI-E 4.0 lanes. Since you're not using a PCI-E 4.0 NVMe drive or an RDNA GPU. The B450 chipset allows you to overclock to your heart's desire.
- If you don't need 8 cores, the 6-core 3600 (or even the 3600X if you want an extra letter), cost up to $100 less for almost no performance loss over the 3700X.
- Then, if the money is freed up on those items, you might be able to reach for 2080 Super or a nicer headset, or even a set of speakers like the Logitech RGB ones
 
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Zoid

Community Contributor
Jan 13, 2020
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How is this build looking for Ultra Wide Gaming on a budget?
What games will you be playing? I also see that our definitions of "on a budget" are very different :p

I can't say I can really fault the overall spec much, but some of these decisions seem unwise. Can I ask why you're spending over $400 on 9 fans in addition to the two that are included with the case? I'm not certain your case even supports that many.
 
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May 3, 2020
5
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These are my thoughts, I saw the price at the bottom of the list and thought how this could be a budget build until I saw your monitor haha.

- I would say go for a B450 board since X570 is only needed if you need those PCI-E 4.0 lanes. Since you're not using a PCI-E 4.0 NVMe drive or an RDNA GPU. The B450 chipset allows you to overclock to your heart's desire.
- If you don't need 8 cores, the 6-core 3600 (or even the 3600X if you want an extra letter), cost up to $100 less for almost no performance loss over the 3700X.
- Then, if the money is freed up on those items, you might be able to reach for 2080 Super or a nicer headset, or even a set of speakers like the Logitech RGB ones
The x570 mobo will last me atleast 4-5 years in CPU upgrades that's why its on my build list.

I was actually going for a 12 core Ryzen 7 but I decided to cut back to the 8 core 3700x.
 
May 3, 2020
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What games will you be playing? I also see that our definitions of "on a budget" are very different

I can't say I can really fault the overall spec much, but some of these decisions seem unwise. Can I ask why you're spending over $400 on 9 fans in addition to the two that are included with the case? I'm not certain your case even supports that many.
- Insurgency Sandstorm
- Escape From Takrov
- Arma III
- CyberPunk 2077
- Future Titles (Mainly FPS/Mil-Sim games & Rockstar's new releases)

Looking to play these games @ 70-100 FPS.

The case supports x3 in fornt, x3 on top, x2 on bottom & x1 at the back. I was going to remove and sell the 2 stock fans it came with seeing as their not RGB and cannot connect to iCue (Corsair Software).
 
May 2, 2020
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The x570 mobo will last me atleast 4-5 years in CPU upgrades that's why its on my build list.

I was actually going for a 12 core Ryzen 7 but I decided to cut back to the 8 core 3700x.
The motherboard chipset shouldn't have an impact on the longevity and performance of the board itself. Intel makes their high-end chipset the only one for overclocking, but AMD allows it for the mid-range B450 boards.

As for the core count, what do you plan on using this desktop for aside from gaming? In the next 4-5 years, we'll definitely see more games exceeding the 4-core limit that has been a staple of CPUs for the past decade. I would highly recommend using UserBenchmark to do the comparisons side by side of both CPUs and GPUs. For the Ryzen 3000 lineup, the difference is really just in the core count, so if you're not doing a ton of multi-threaded work, a high core count does nothing for you.
 
May 3, 2020
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- Insurgency Sandstorm
- Escape From Takrov
- Arma III
- CyberPunk 2077
- Future Titles (Mainly FPS/Mil-Sim games & Rockstar's new releases)

Looking to play these games @ 70-100 FPS.

The motherboard chipset shouldn't have an impact on the longevity and performance of the board itself. Intel makes their high-end chipset the only one for overclocking, but AMD allows it for the mid-range B450 boards.

As for the core count, what do you plan on using this desktop for aside from gaming? In the next 4-5 years, we'll definitely see more games exceeding the 4-core limit that has been a staple of CPUs for the past decade. I would highly recommend using UserBenchmark to do the comparisons side by side of both CPUs and GPUs. For the Ryzen 3000 lineup, the difference is really just in the core count, so if you're not doing a ton of multi-threaded work, a high core count does nothing for you.
I game, do light video editing in Sony Vegas & graphic design work in Photoshop.
 

Zoid

Community Contributor
Jan 13, 2020
515
673
1,270
The x570 mobo will last me atleast 4-5 years in CPU upgrades that's why its on my build list.
I would advise against making multiple CPU upgrades in a 4-5 year period, but to each their own. To @lamboto's point, a B450 board would be fine unless you expect to be able to take advantage of PCIe 4.0.
- Insurgency Sandstorm
- Escape From Takrov
- Arma III
- CyberPunk 2077
- Future Titles (Mainly FPS/Mil-Sim games & Rockstar's new releases)

Looking to play these games @ 70-100 FPS.

The case supports x3 in fornt, x3 on top, x2 on bottom & x1 at the back. I was going to remove and sell the 2 stock fans it came with seeing as their not RGB and cannot connect to iCue (Corsair Software).
If you fiddle with settings here and there you should be able to get reasonably good performance in those games at 3440 x 1440 with a 2070 Super. Of course for games like Cyberpunk that aren't out yet, it's impossible to say what performance you should expect.

I still don't think this build is a particularly efficient or wise allocation of funds, but then again frugality may not be as big of a concern to you, so I won't harp on it toooooo much ;)
 
May 3, 2020
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I still don't think this build is a particularly efficient or wise allocation of funds, but then again frugality may not be as big of a concern to you, so I won't harp on it toooooo much
would i be better off getting a 2080 super in the long run over a 2070 super?

how many more years would the 2080 S last me gaming @ 3440x1440 vs a 2070 S
 
May 2, 2020
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I'd like to preface; I'm an anti-RGB person. This build is excellent on paper, especially when you visualize the clean look of that case and the all Corsair RGB, extending to your keyboard and headphones. But, all that RGB doesn't equate to value, it's a luxury. If you're trying to go for the best bang for your buck, I've modified your parts list to what would be a little more economical and a better value.

Your current parts list is about $3300 for the desktop, plus the cost of the monitor is an extra $1200. In this list, I removed all of the items that don't improve your experience/performance, i.e., the RGB. The PSU you selected is also a lot higher than anyone needs in their system. Many people think the 750-850w range is ideal, but their system is only pulling around 450W max, so I downgraded the PSU to a 650W. The RGB RAM was $70 more expensive than non-RGB RAM that also fits under the Noctua DH-15, which now includes AM4 brackets as of 3 months ago, which increased your CFM by about 60% so you'll see lower temps and therefore a quieter machine. I also swapped all the fans for Noctua ones since Noctua makes the best cooling hardware in existence for consumers. I also noticed the headphones you picked along with the keyboard were a little lacking. The Razer Nari Ultimates use haptic feedback to improve immersion in games, and you'll be playing games that enjoy it more. I own a pair myself, any can attest that some people don't like the feeling of interacting with their games, but it up's the immersion factor by 100%. The Logitech G915 is a low-latency wireless mechanical keyboard that comes with clicky, linear, or tactile switches depending on your preference. The case is also cheaper, it does not lack as a case, but it's a lot more value for what you're getting. Then, from all the cost savings, I was able to add a 1500VA True Sine Wave (the sine wave is essential as a simulated sine wave can damage your components) PSU, which I would consider a requirement for a system this expensive.


would i be better off getting a 2080 super in the long run over a 2070 super?

how many more years would the 2080 S last me gaming @ 3440x1440 vs a 2070 S
There's no way to tell. For all we know, NVIDIA and AMD could release cards for $500 next year that outperform the 2080ti. If you want to be able to play all of the latest games at your resolution on max settings on the 2080S for five years, I'd guess that there will be a AAA game coming along eventually that will make you turn down the settings. However, 3440x1440 is fewer pixels than 4K; the 2070S is the first non-80/ti model I've seen recommended for 4K gaming. The 2080S performs about 10-20% better than the 2070S.

I would advise against making multiple CPU upgrades in a 4-5 year period, but to each their own. To @lamboto's point, a B450 board would be fine unless you expect to be able to take advantage of PCIe 4.0.

If you fiddle with settings here and there you should be able to get reasonably good performance in those games at 3440 x 1440 with a 2070 Super. Of course for games like Cyberpunk that aren't out yet, it's impossible to say what performance you should expect.

I still don't think this build is a particularly efficient or wise allocation of funds, but then again frugality may not be as big of a concern to you, so I won't harp on it toooooo much ;)
I agree with this kind fellow. He knows what he's talking about. I think you're overestimating how CPU's age. An i7 from 2013 still keeps up with a new i7. CPUs power used to double every two years, but we've hit a wall because the architectures have gotten so small. AMD currently uses a 7nm process; the lowest they could physically go would be 5nm because 4nm begins the quantum computing realm. If you're gaming, you want to throw as much as you can into your GPU, because that's also what matters for rendering. I would advise higher core counts if you were doing CAD work or playing more strategy/simulation games that rely on the CPU for great math and designed to leverage extra cores.

I apologize for the length and possible redundancy of this post, I started typing it this morning and returned to finish it throughout the day.
 

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