I need suggestions for buying parts to build my first gaming computer.

Jul 12, 2020
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Ok so i'm willing to spend around $800, though it will take me about 2-3 months to save up. This may change depending on what answers i get or if im patient enough to save up more or less. Since i live in an apartment i don't want to risk something expensive being delivered here. Most deliveries sit downstairs and sometimes dont even make it inside the lobby...ive seen stuff laying in between the lobby and outside and literally anyone can walk up and take it. With that being said i think my only choice is to buy parts from best buy and i seen that they will price match so thats good. in the next month or so i'll try to come here with parts that are in my price range and try to get some suggestions.

If someone has the time to check what best buy has and make some recommendations i would really appreciate it. I would also appreciate any info about this subject. I've been looking on their website but idk what to pick so i'm reading reviews. So what should be my first purchase as a base ...motherboard? graphics card? or processor? ...i've seen some videos online like "building gaming pc's for dummies " and every video the person is building some computer with like rainbow lights and stuff...which is cool...but i'd rather not have any bells and whistles as i feel like it will just ramp up my electric bill....im going for something more practice not flashy. If building one is too hard maybe i'll buy the parts and have their geek squad build it if thats an option.
 
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Jun 24, 2020
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Firstly, it's almost impossible to build a cheaper gaming computer than one you can buy off a shelf: Computer manufacturers buy components in bulk at a discount.

Still, when I make a part list for any build, the first thing I ask people is what case they want: That's about the only component you'll see if you don't want a side panel window; so the first step to loving what you've done is its appearance.

Second, the games you want to play should dictate what hardware you buy. Look up the minimum and recommended hardware requirements for the games that interest you.

Once you have a list of basic parts like processor, memory, and motherboard, check prices and see how much you have left over for a graphics card and power supply. The better your graphics card is, the more detail and effects you can have on the screen in games.

Finally, enter the components you chose into a power supply calculator to determine how many watts you'll need. I use OuterVision's: https://outervision.com/power-supply-calculator

Don't forget to factor in the cost of Windows too when making your grand total.
 
Feb 17, 2020
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Firstly, it's almost impossible to build a cheaper gaming computer than one you can buy off a shelf: Computer manufacturers buy components in bulk at a discount.
That's not entirely accurate - it depends what deals there are on of course, on both individual components and prebuilds, but it's often cheaper to self build than to buy off the shelf.

I'd also be cautious about minimum and recommended hardware requirements for games. Better to look up actual benchmarks of gaming performance, where these are available anyway :)

in the next month or so i'll try to come here with parts that are in my price range and try to get some suggestions.
Prices and availability can change a lot, and there is some chance we'll see new components as early as September too. So I might not bother working up a parts list until the purchase is imminent.
 
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