Can Pc Part Picker be wrong on compatibility

Aug 10, 2020
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I'm still in the process of deciding what to do about new build, looks like I'm leaving Intel and going to AMD. I've recently watched a video on YouTube about building a $1k(US) PC, the basis of the build focuses on Ryzen 5 3600 and a prime x570-p mobo. The build uses a GTX 1660 super graphics card, I'm not a pc gamer and I don't want to spend £200+ gbp on a gpu that won't be used to it full capacity, the card I've looked at is a GT 710. I've used PC Part Picker, can it be trusted that compatibility is correct, or has somebody found that in some instances that isn't the case.
 
Feb 17, 2020
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Can Pc Part Picker be wrong on compatibility
Yes. Like anything based on data entry it's only as good as the data entered. The data is provided by humans and entered by humans and so there can be human error. e.g.
In that instance it claimed a case was ATX, so you'd expect it to fit an ATX mobo - but it can't because it's M-ATX. You can see that forum exists to review proposed corrections to parts, as well as the addition of new ones.

There might also be some complex combinations it doesn't take into account in some instances I suppose.

It's very, very good, and serious errors aren't all that common, but isn't absolutely infallible.

if you want a second opinion on compatibility and component choice, feel free to post:
your partpicker build
your uses and what you want from the system
budget and currency

(for uses and what you want be as specific as possible - e.g. editing in Premiere Pro, a quiet machine, powering 2 4k monitors, or powering 1 1080p monitor, RGB lighting coming out of its eyes, PC needs to fit into a desk cubby so it can melt, etc, etc :))

Notwithstanding that people here are human and just as capable of getting it wrong too ;)
 
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I was going to ask why you were switching from Intel to AMD, then you said "im not a pc gamer" and then it made sense ;) jk jk but i want to know why you were switching brands and for your intial question YES, anything can be wrong, everyone thinks they are right with information, you just need to cross reference and dont go by 1 or 2 peoples opinions. If you dont trust pcpartpicker to the fullest, use multiple sites to check compatibility issues.
 
Aug 10, 2020
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Is this build ok, especially the gpu, I'll be using the pc for ripping cds on iTunes to put on either my ipod or my dads ipod, streaming music to a sonos speaker, surfing the net, occasionally stream live sport. The idea of the build is for easy upgrade and try to get longevity. If you wondering why I've added windows 10, it's for me to see for costs

 
Feb 17, 2020
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It's fine

My main queries are:

1) the GPU - what monitor(s) are you going to be using? if you're just connecting a 1080p monitor or TV via HDMI and that's it, it's fine. if you will want tyo connect a 4k monitor, it's not fine.

2) Why the X570 board? And why that X570 board in particular?

I won't ask about the entertainment streaming as I assume you're already happy with the setup of that.
 
Aug 10, 2020
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It's fine

My main queries are:

1) the GPU - what monitor(s) are you going to be using? if you're just connecting a 1080p monitor or TV via HDMI and that's it, it's fine. if you will want tyo connect a 4k monitor, it's not fine.

2) Why the X570 board? And why that X570 board in particular?

I won't ask about the entertainment streaming as I assume you're already happy with the setup of that.

Pc will be connected to a 1080i/1080p standard tv.

I'm led to believe the asus prime x570-p is a good board and will allow easy upgrade as when new pci gen 4 is more widely used in various components, I don't want to relistically have to start from scratch if I want to upgrade in the future. It's 3rd gen ready for the processor I want no potching with flashing the board etc. Is there something wrong with the board? Is there something else to consider, given I might upgrade parts in the future?
 
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Then the 710 is fine as a GPU

It sounds like you're going for PCIe 4.0 for generic futureproofing.

It's your call, but I don't see it being any advantage unless your uses for the system change. What would PCIe 4.0 actually do for you? None of your uses are going to be meaningfully affected by storage speed (PCIe 4.0 SSDs), and unless you take up 4k gaming with a top end future-gen GPU, that's not relevant either. Also PCIe 5.0 will start coming to consumers in 2022 I believe.

Also the 750W PSU. Your system would be hard-pressed to use 150W. Even a top tier gaming graphics card 'only' uses ~300W under load.

PSU prices are all over the place at the moment due to the pandemic, which I suspect is partly why you've ended up with a 750W unit (price differences aren't as large as usual versus 550W RM/RMx). But you could still get something much less expensive.
 
Aug 10, 2020
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As I’m starting over, would it be better that I buy the core components together or do I trust that if I shop around within reason, it will be ok to be cherry pick the deals.
 
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Shop around. If different stores offer better prices (including shipping) then buy from different stores. There's no specific down side other than your finger needing to hit the 'checkout'button a few mote times.

Some retailers do bundles of hardware e.g. mobo + CPU + RAM that can carry a discount versus buying individually.

Some retailers have add-on packs for sale - I think Scan have one where if you buy certain components from them, and the protection plan, and then break the pins on CPU installation, they cover the replacement. Tbh anyone paying that much attention is unlikely to smite the pins, but if plans like that appeal to you that may be an incentive to buy X components together from a given retailer.

I would personally avoid Amazon Marketplace sellers as they can cause warranty issues (Amazon's fine, third party sellers there possibly not). Some big third party sellers like Scan, Ebuyer, etc with storefronts on Amazon have their own sites anyway as they are major UK etailers.

Also I'm not sure if PCPartpicker includes ebuyer - I think it doesn't?. If not and you're shopping around, do check out their prices too.

You'll want to buy the parts at pretty much the same time though so that you can assemble the system asap once they start arriving. To avoid parts missing their return window should there be a fault / running down the clock on their warranties unnecessarily.
 
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