Best way to combat VR nausea?

Feb 19, 2020
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Hi there! I love the idea of VR, but every time I try to play with it, I start a rapid decline into nausea. I am currently using Dramamine to help, but that has its own drawbacks of course.

Others like me: what do you do, what do you use? Is it possible to just get used to it over time?

I don't want to miss out on all the great new games coming down the VR pipeline!
ST
 
Jan 13, 2020
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Hey! Do you encounter this with all games or just games in which you can freely move about with a control stick, etc? I have found I get nauseous right away unless using the teleportation style movement (in Vader Immortal for example)

Otherwise I don't feel nauseous, but I start developing a headache fairly quickly. Still haven't figured out if that is partially from the comfort of the Quest headset itself...
 
Jan 13, 2020
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Firstly, make sure you select the stepped turning (not smooth turning). I think pretty much anyone would barf from smooth turning.

If you want to try medication, maybe try meclizine or bonine. I grew up on a fishing boat and get hella sea sick. meclizine is the one that works for me. Might be prescription though, not sure.

Also I used to get VR sickness, but now I don't, so perhaps you'll adapt over time. Seated games, like Elite Dangerous are the easiest to stomach in my experience.
 
Jan 13, 2020
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I have an electric fan constantly blowing on me during play. Air circulation is very helpful as it keeps you cool AND somewhat simulates movement on your body. It likely gives your brain a bit of comfort with all the simulated movement. But yes, stay cool and keep air circulated!!!
 
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Mar 4, 2020
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I mentioned that I got pretty motion sick and my brother recommended that I use a fan. I don't think it entirely fixes the problem, but a standing fan does help me some. I keep it a bit far back because I tend to move forward/backward quite a bit, but that's partly because I'm using a Quest wirelessly so I never really got into the habit of standing in one spot in VR quite right.

In game, switching to teleporting usually helps me, though again it doesn't eliminate it entirely. That said, I have started to get a bit less nauseous in general since I started, so I think a bit of it is just adjustment as well. I usually get about 30 minutes to an hour into a game before I start to even feel nauseous at all, though, so I'm probably not the most sensitive and I would imagine that someone who is extremely susceptible might not have that option.
 
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ZedClampet

Community Contributor
Hi there! I love the idea of VR, but every time I try to play with it, I start a rapid decline into nausea. I am currently using Dramamine to help, but that has its own drawbacks of course.

Others like me: what do you do, what do you use? Is it possible to just get used to it over time?

I don't want to miss out on all the great new games coming down the VR pipeline!
ST

Try taking a ginger supplement about 20 minutes before you play. I saw this on Mythbusters and tried it with my son, and it works perfectly for him.
 
May 1, 2020
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For me it was just playing VR until i got used to it. Now smooth turning and free movement doesnt faze me.
 
Jan 14, 2020
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If a game offers motion-sickness compensation features, enable them. I realize this sounds like a no-brainer, but I ignored them in Skyrim VR at first, and regretted it immensely. Otherwise what everyone else said is pretty solid advice. It's also possible that some games are simply outside of your comfort zone, whether due to age or eyesight or some other factor. Hopefully not, but for instance, I used to be able to go on rollercoasters and I loved them, but nowadays I get serious vertigo and end up throwing up anything I ate in the hours prior. But hopefully the above tips will help. (The only one I might disagree with is the Elite Dangerous one, all it takes is one barrel roll and I'm nauseous.)

Also if you know your IPD, make sure your headset is calibrated accordingly. (If you have an optometrist, they can measure it for you. Or you can eyeball it yourself, though I've not had good results with that method.)
 
Mar 24, 2020
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Personal experience: It's been likened to getting "Sea Legs" by many including me. You just get used to it. My first VR experience was "The Wizards" on steam, where I tried the settings with smooth turning and my character walking normally. Big mistake!

However now I can do the same with no problem. I'd recommend using teleport whereever possible and if still getting nauseous, use Bigscreen (movie theatre/tv) or another stationary app where you can relax in vr without moving for a bit as a break without taking vr off entirely. It took me about 2 weeks before the queasiness went away.
 

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